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Kitsilano Stats for August 2006

 thought you might be interested to see this graph put out by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver, showing the average prices from January 1977 to August 2006. Comparing these empasizes the changes that have gone on in this city over the years. In 1977 Coal Harbour hadn’t even been developed yet, and is now Vancouver’s prime luxury waterfront neighbourhood.

price graph

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Price Summary Vancouver Real Estate

I thought you might be interested to see this graph put out by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver, showing the average prices from January 1977 to August 2006. Comparing these empasizes the changes that have gone on in this city over the years. In 1977 Coal Harbour hadn’t even been developed yet, and is now Vancouver’s prime luxury waterfront neighbourhood.

price graph

(Note: This post orginally appeared in the shared blog, Coal Harbour: Urban Living on the Waterfront, now discontinued)

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Kitsilano Streets Named after Trees – Yew Street

As the season changes, I thought it would be fun to look into the interesting aspects of Kitsilano’s street names: particularly all the streets named for trees. Starting with the Yew, I looked up some tree lore and here’s what I found.

How to recognize a yew tree:
First, it is an evergreen conifer. Green year round. Look at the needles, spiraling on the smallest branches. They are shiny and flat with a sharp pointed tip, and very dark green on top, with a paler yellow-green underside. Normally yew looks like a lowspreading shrub or small tree, with branches spread out or downwards and the trunk can even be twisted. Young trees look square, older trees are conical, and they tend to grow from 5 – 15 metres high, although some very old trees have been known to grow to 25 metres. The Western Yew is native, and is found at low to mid elevations on the coast and interior of BC. It has pollen cones on the male trees, and seed cones on the female. These are red and look like berries, each of which contains a single seed. Yew bark is darkish red or purply, thin and scaly, which peels to show a rosy underbark. This inner bark was traditionally used for braiding and weaving.

In the wild, Pacific yew generally live 200-300 years with some specimens living 400 years or more.
Taxol which is used in some cancer treatment, is made from yew bark. First Nations peoples used the Pacific Yew as an anti-inflammatory, and for rheumatism, scurvy, lung and bowel complaints. Although it has medicinal uses, the yew is considered poisonous.

The yew tree produces a great deal of pollen, and in England, Druids used to gather pollen to create special magical effects during clan gatherings, throwing yew pollen into the fire at night to create beautiful little sparks. Yew was considered one of the guardian trees, and was traditionally planted near wells or over blind springs. In the olden days, people gave thanks to the water by singing to the well at Midsummer night, or by ‘Well-dressing’ – decorating the well with petals and sprays of yew. In the old mythical stories, Yew sprays were sometimes used as dowsing tools to find things which were lost.

Yew Street is very green, thanks to City of Vancouver tree-planting, but any yews you see there are courtesy of the independent gardens and hedges of residents and owners. Yew Street ends at the beach, where it meets Cornwall. Just up from Kits Beach, on this street named for the Yew, we find thriving businesses and cafes. To name a few of the eateries: Rossini’s, Café Zen, Café Dall Aqua, Sunset Grill, and Yew First. Then there are Kingshead Inn, Kits Sushi, Urban Well, Malones, Viva Fine Food and Bakery, not to mention the Tangerine Lounge, and more.
And remember to check out the market at 1575 Yew – one of the best places to pick up some fresh flowers and potted plants. Maybe even a little sprig of yew!

And now for Yew Trivia!
What does Robin Hood have to do with Kitsilano’s Yew Street?
The Latin name for the Yew is “taxus” which means “bow” and Robin’s bow was supposedly made from yew wood, which is dense, strong and resilient.

westyew

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Coal Harbour Hot Deal

New Coal Harbour Listing priced to sell fast at 1239 W. Georgia, Unit 2502.PRICE REDUCED $25,000 FOR IMMEDIATE SALE.List price: $449,000.00

Desirable S.E. Corner in The Venus, steps to the waterfront. Two bedrooms. Features 2 full baths and gas fireplace. 24 hours concierge, 80 ft indoor pool, gym, sauna, steam, party room, ballroom, visitor parking, guest suite. 795 sq. ft. Tenanted at $1600 per month.

lap-pool

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Coal Harbour Listing – price reduced for immediate sale

New Coal Harbour Listing priced to sell fast at 1239 W. Georgia, Unit 2502.PRICE REDUCED $25,000 FOR IMMEDIATE SALE.List price: $449,000.00

Desirable S.E. Corner in The Venus, steps to the waterfront. Two bedrooms. Features 2 full baths and gas fireplace. 24 hours concierge, 80 ft indoor pool, gym, sauna, steam, party room, ballroom, visitor parking, guest suite. 795 sq. ft. Tenanted at $1600 per month.

lap-pool
Lap Pool at the Venus

venus-view
View from the suite

the venus
The Venus at Coal Harbour, built in 1999.

Contact me for more info.

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Positive Densification

So many real estate blogs feature statistics.

Although I like to add these from time to time, your best source for these would be to subscribe to my e-zine, or check my website, which has many pages devoted to this data. In this blog, I want to reveal more about Kitsilano, to celebrate the community, and add my voice to define its character and nature.

While the demographic of Kits has shifted many times over the years, the value of Kitsilano to Vancouver has increased from decade to decade. As Vancouver becomes increasingly densified, the neighbourhood definition and integrated development in Kitsilano will be seen more and more as an example for development elsewhere.

Even with some larger condominium projects, which enable even more people to make this area their home, the neighbourhood impact of this densification is positive.

Attention by developers to the scale and scope of the neighbourhood, and the placement of denser structures (mostly) on the main streets has preserved the feel of this neighbourhood of tree-lined streets, well-tended gardens and heritage homes.

From the Greeks to the hippies to the families, couples and singles who invested in the area from the 80’s on, Kitsilano has provided homes to a wide range of Vancouver’s population.

Sit outside with a coffee or smoothie at Capers’ patio on 4th, between the Capers store and Duthie Books and do some people-watching. This is one version of Kitsilano. Many of the people walking by have come to Kits as a destination, from other parts of the city. Others are running errands – they live here.

In fact, it is so convenient they don’t need to use their cars for so many of these errands. The essentials are all here: groceries, drugstore, bank, even a hardware store, within a short radius. Not to mention all the other retail necessities: books, music, hiking gear, coffee, garden supplies, gifts and, of course, fabulous shoes!

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

The Character of Kitsilano

Much of the character of Kitsilano is drawn from the historic houses that can be found while walking the tree-lined streets.

As well, the landscaping and gardens of the homes here reveal wonderful examples of West Coast gardening – from Zen to English gardens.

One lovely example of Kitsilano character can be seen on Stephens Street, where many houses have been listed as heritage buildings by the city. Take a walk on Stephens Street, and in particular check out these blocks: 1600, 1800, 1900 with an eye for the heritage character of the houses on these streets. The 2200 block has even more heritage-listed homes, then there are a few more on 2300 and the 2400 blocks. I find these heritage homes offer not only character, but an anchor to the area that keeps it in touch with the past. The heritage designation means that these homes are less likely to be significantly changed without preservation of their original intention.

But heritage does not mean that a building cannot be revitalized, and you can see a great example of this at 2990 West 5th Avenue. An existing house, built in the 1920’s, is listed in the Vancouver Heritage Register, and is also part of a significant streetscape of similar Craftsman or “California” Bungalow style architecture. It has been renovated and remodeled in a method of conservation called “adaptive re-use”. The single-family house was converted into a back-to-back duplex through a 12 foot addition to the back of the house, and two bays extending out on either side. This adaptation respects the historic fabric of the existing building, and retains the character of the area.

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Kits Market Heats Up Compared to a Year Ago

The Market in Kits has Heated Up.


Comparing the sales of Kits houses and condos between last May, 2005 and May of this year reveals a dramatic increase.
Just look at these figures.

Condos:A year ago, you could buy a kits condo for as low as $195,000. Now it’s up to $225,000. The median price in may ’05 was $349,000, while this May it was $444,000.This year, Vue at Kits (2386 Cornwall) has achieved the highest $ per square foot price ever for a Kitsilano condo, at $2.3 Million for 1800 sq. ft.
In general, Kits condo prices have increased 14% over the last year, 60% over last 3 years and 100% over last 5 years.

Houses:
The median price of a Kits house a year ago was $756,000, now its up to $951,000.
This May, 21 house sales were recorded, at prices ranging from $735,000 – $1,818,000. 14 sold over list price, 4 sold full price, only 3 were less than list. Of these, only 12 sold under $1M.
Contrast this with May 2005: 11 sales, with 8 sold under $1Million. 2 sold over list and 3 at full price.

This May saw townhome sales at 35. Of these, 6 were under $500,000, and 32 were under $1Million. Of these, 8 sold over list price, while11 sold at full price.
Contrast this with the statistics for last year, May 2005, with 22 sales. At that time, 10 sold under $500,000, all 22 sold under $1Million; 4 sold over list and 4 sold at list price.

A total of 47 condos sold this May in Kits. The least expensive of these: $225K for a 475 sq ft studio at 1425 Cypress. The most expensive? 2385 Cornwall: $2.3Million for 1790 sq. ft.
Next expensive: 2268 W. Broadway (The Vine, which is under construction) selling 988 sq. ft. for $610,000. 30 of these sales were one bedroom suites. The most expensive was 2175 Salal, where 756 sq. ft. sold for $465,000 (or $615 pr sq ft). Compare this with its selling price in February ’04 of $345,000.
The least expensive 2 bedroom condo was 1990 W. 6th, where 759 sq ft sold for $355,000. This May only 9 sales were under $300,000, while 20 sales were under $400,000 and 5 were over $500,000.

Once again, compare with May ‘05 Kits condo sales when 59 condos sold. The least expensive was 2565 W. Broadway at $171,500. The most expensive was 2263 Redbud, $670,000. Of these, 3 were studios, 32 were one bedrooms, the rest were two bedrooms. The least expensive one bedroom was 2125 W. 2nd at $195,000, and the most expensive was 2288 Marstrand at $366,000. In two bedrooms, the least expensive was $305,000 at 1845 W. 7th.
In May ’05, 28 sales were under $300,000; 50 were under $400,000 and 4 were over $500.000.

I have always known Kitsilano to be one of the most desirable areas of the city, and these stats confirm that many others agree. Ask me about current availability in Kits – I’d be more than happy to help you.

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Kitsilano Living

So many people want to live here, aKitsilano is one of Vancouver’s most sought-after neighbourhoods.

There is good reason for this. Not only is it close to downtown, but the beach is so close. In the early days of Vancouver, this beach was used for outdoor camping, and archival photos show lines of tents along the beach in the summertime.

It’s still an extremely popular beach, and today, along the seawalk/bikepath that goes around Kits Point connecting to False Creek, you can see all the sunscreened people playing at the volleyball nets. On days like today the beach is filled with people enjoying themselves in the sun, or having a picnic at a table in the shade of the trees.

 Living in Kits means access to the beach, by bike or walking. And when summer ends, and the crowds have gone home, the beach is still there waiting for you.
Next time you’re on Broadway and 4th you can see the Greek restaurants and stores in their connection to the early days of Kitsilano, when it was home to Vancouver’s Greek community. Acknowledging that heritage, yesterday was the annual Greek Day, part of Hellenic Culture week.

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Kitsilano Living

As you can see from the stats in my last posting, Kitsilano is one of Vancouver’s most sought-after neighbourhoods. So many people want to live here, and there is good reason for this. Not only is it close to downtown, but the beach is so close. In the early days of Vancouver, this beach was used for outdoor camping, and archival photos show lines of tents along the beach in the summertime. It’s still an extremely popular beach, and today, along the seawalk/bikepath that goes around Kits Point connecting to False Creek, you can see all the sunscreened people playing at the volleyball nets. On days like today the beach is filled with people enjoying themselves in the sun, or having a picnic at a table in the shade of the trees. Living in Kits means access to the beach, by bike or walking. And when summer ends, and the crowds have gone home, the beach is still there waiting for you.
Next time you’re on Broadway and 4th you can see the Greek restaurants and stores in their connection to the early days of Kitsilano, when it was home to Vancouver’s Greek community. Acknowledging that heritage, yesterday was the annual Greek Day, part of Hellenic Culture week.

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Compared with Last May: Kits Market Has Heated Up

The Market in Kits has Heated Up.
Comparing the sales of Kits houses and condos between last May, 2005 and May of this year reveals a dramatic increase.
Just look at these figures.

Condos:A year ago, you could buy a kits condo for as low as $195,000. Now it’s up to $225,000. The median price in may ’05 was $349,000, while this May it was $444,000.This year, Vue at Kits (2386 Cornwall) has achieved the highest $ per square foot price ever for a Kitsilano condo, at $2.3 Million for 1800 sq. ft.
In general, Kits condo prices have increased 14% over the last year, 60% over last 3 years and 100% over last 5 years.

Houses:
The median price of a Kits house a year ago was $756,000, now its up to $951,000.
This May, 21 house sales were recorded, at prices ranging from $735,000 – $1,818,000. 14 sold over list price, 4 sold full price, only 3 were less than list. Of these, only 12 sold under $1M.
Contrast this with May 2005: 11 sales, with 8 sold under $1Million. 2 sold over list and 3 at full price.

This May saw townhome sales at 35. Of these, 6 were under $500,000, and 32 were under $1Million. Of these, 8 sold over list price, while11 sold at full price.
Contrast this with the statistics for last year, May 2005, with 22 sales. At that time, 10 sold under $500,000, all 22 sold under $1Million; 4 sold over list and 4 sold at list price.

A total of 47 condos sold this May in Kits. The least expensive of these: $225K for a 475 sq ft studio at 1425 Cypress. The most expensive? 2385 Cornwall: $2.3Million for 1790 sq. ft.
Next expensive: 2268 W. Broadway (The Vine, which is under construction) selling 988 sq. ft. for $610,000. 30 of these sales were one bedroom suites. The most expensive was 2175 Salal, where 756 sq. ft. sold for $465,000 (or $615 pr sq ft). Compare this with its selling price in February ’04 of $345,000.
The least expensive 2 bedroom condo was 1990 W. 6th, where 759 sq ft sold for $355,000. This May only 9 sales were under $300,000, while 20 sales were under $400,000 and 5 were over $500,000.

Once again, compare with May ‘05 Kits condo sales when 59 condos sold. The least expensive was 2565 W. Broadway at $171,500. The most expensive was 2263 Redbud, $670,000. Of these, 3 were studios, 32 were one bedrooms, the rest were two bedrooms. The least expensive one bedroom was 2125 W. 2nd at $195,000, and the most expensive was 2288 Marstrand at $366,000. In two bedrooms, the least expensive was $305,000 at 1845 W. 7th.
In May ’05, 28 sales were under $300,000; 50 were under $400,000 and 4 were over $500.000.

I have always known Kitsilano to be one of the most desirable areas of the city, and these stats confirm that many others agree. Ask me about current availability in Kits – I’d be more than happy to help you.

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Everything I Love About Kits

In this blog I’ll be sharing with you all the reasons why Kitsilano is one of Vancouver’s most sought-after neighbourhoods.

The nearness to the beach is big on this list, but also the vital community, the character houses, and the treed streets. New developments reflect the desire of so many Vancouverites to live in Kits, and these are (by and large) clearly integrated within the existing look and feel of the community.

 Older historic homes have been kept in beautiful condition, many of the apartments built in the mid-sixties have been converted to strata suites, and year-round the residential streets are alive with the varied activity of singles, couples, and families – on foot, on bikes, with or without dogs. Kitsilano’s proximity to downtown is definitely a plus. 

This popular Vancouver webcam shows Kits Point to the upper right, joined to downtown Vancouver by the historic Burrard Bridge. (Thanks KatKam!) 

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

The Character of Kitsilano

Much of the character of Kitsilano is drawn from the historic houses that can be found while walking the tree-lined streets. As well, the landscaping and gardens of the homes here reveal wonderful examples of West Coast gardening – from Zen to English gardens.

One lovely example of Kitsilano character can be seen on Stephens Street, where many houses have been listed as heritage buildings by the city. Take a walk on Stephens Street, and in particular check out these blocks: 1600, 1800, 1900 with an eye for the heritage character of the houses on these streets. The 2200 block has even more heritage-listed homes, then there are a few more on 2300 and the 2400 blocks.

I find these heritage homes offer not only character, but an anchor to the area that keeps it in touch with the past. The heritage designation means that these homes are less likely to be significantly changed without preservation of their original intention.

But heritage does not mean that a building cannot be revitalized, and you can see a great example of this at 2990 West 5th Avenue. An existing house, built in the 1920’s, is listed in the Vancouver Heritage Register, and is also part of a significant streetscape of similar Craftsman or “California” Bungalow style architecture. It has been renovated and remodeled in a method of conservation called “adaptive re-use”.

 The single-family house was converted into a back-to-back duplex through a 12 foot addition to the back of the house, and two bays extending out on either side. This adaptation respects the historic fabric of the existing building, and retains the character of the area.

by Maggie Chandler Maggie Chandler No Comments

Vancouver Magazine’s Fourth Annual Big Night

You’re invited! The City’s premier celebration of food and wine.

Venue: The Vancouver Club, 915 W. Hastings, Vancouver on January 30, 2009.

6-8p.m.

Taste, sip and mingle with local celebrity chefs, media and more. Winning restaurants from Vancouver magazines 19th Annual Restaurant Awards prepare dishes to be paired with award-winning wines from the 2009 Vancouver Magazine International Wine competition.

Tickets $123.10 ($6.60 gst + 6.50 a/c). Dress code in effect (no jeans)

<!– The Vancouver Club –>
 

 

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